Cardboard Monet, Graphic Design., Random., Web Design.

Why Covers Tend to Look the Same

April 5, 2016
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I’m a designer across multiple platforms, so I spend a lot of time in different states of creativity. Every time of art has groups of similarities, whether it be pop music featuring a familiar beat, or portfolio websites all featuring parallax scrolling, and everything in between. Since my main focus is book production, I thought I’d take a look at book covers, and why so frequently we see similarities—and sometimes even blatant copies—within the same genres.

We’re all familiar with the old adage “never judge a book by its cover.” But, guess what, we all do it, and not just with books. The entire advertising industry is built upon your first impression, and it being positive enough for you to part with your hard-earned dollars. Same goes for publishing. Recognition is important. If, from across the room, you can determine a book’s key genre, and even it’s intended audience age, the cover artist and publisher have succeeded in their duties. Why? Because a glance can be as quick as a few seconds, sometimes even shorter, and you’ve already been able to analyze and categorize their book—whether it’s up your alley, or not. That’s more powerful and explains a lot more than even a title or tagline (the second elements a reader sees when perusing for a new book).

Same goes for publishing. Recognition is important.

This explains why the YA dystopian genres feature cracks, and concrete, and decrepit cities. Why most contemporary romances are light, bright and sunny, often featuring two or more people. I’ve seen it far too often, virtually the same cover for two different books within the same genre. Or—gasp—two different books using the same stock photography. It happens more than you think!

Sure, there are books that break the mold and are able to stand out from the rest, but they also have to work harder. I’m guilty of it, too. But that’s not always a bad thing. There’s another saying, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” right?

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